Список форумов Балет и Опера Балет и Опера
Форум для обсуждения тем, связанных с балетом и оперой
 
 FAQFAQ   ПоискПоиск   ПользователиПользователи   ГруппыГруппы   РегистрацияРегистрация 
 ПрофильПрофиль   Войти и проверить личные сообщенияВойти и проверить личные сообщения   ВходВход 

Большой в США - 2005
На страницу Пред.  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  След.
 
Начать новую тему   Ответить на тему    Список форумов Балет и Опера -> Балетное фойе
Предыдущая тема :: Следующая тема  
Автор Сообщение
Оля
Активный участник форума
Активный участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 09.05.2003
Сообщения: 565
Откуда: Москва

СообщениеДобавлено: Пт Июл 22, 2005 3:33 pm    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

Еще отзыв на открытие гастролей, а вот фото Шипулиной (Захаровой тоже есть, не буду повторять)

A vivid, whimsical prance to Spain
BY APOLLINAIRE SCHERR

Newsday July 22, 2005

In the Bolshoi Ballet's signature work, a glowing, mildly kitschy "Don Quixote," the company convinces us that they're dancing not because that's what one does in a ballet, but because that's what you do on dusty Barcelona streets.

These humble Spaniards are kin to the samba-crazy Brazilians in the film "Black Orpheus." They inhabit an unpoliced hillside overlooking a city and the sea, and create a life in common between their houses because it's crowded indoors. They rustle tambourines, stab knives into the ground and send red capes billowing into the air.

As with most dance adaptations of Cervantes' picaresque novel, this "Don Quixote" has less to do with the sweetly crazy dreamer and his lusty sidekick, Sancho Panza - though the two have their moments - than with a spiky romance between two incorrigible flirts named Kitri and Basilio. (In the book, published 400 years ago, the episode occupies only a few pages.)

Kitri's father, a greedy innkeeper, wants her to marry to advantage. But we know from the moment she leaps onto the stage and sets about taunting her impoverished sweetheart that they magnetize each other - and are utterly assured in their union. The only issue is how to keep it interesting.

For that, they use the crowd. The corps transmutes its camaraderie into a persuasive portrait of a close-knit community. In the village-square scene, the crowd responds with minute collective adjustments to the lovebirds' every teasing move.

When the couple sashays into the onlookers' midst, they part and ripple, the flat-shoed women fluttering their fans in lacy patterns. As Kitri brushes along the crowd's edge, everyone bends low to pulse forward, like a wave breaking against her body. (On Monday, Svetlana Zakharova was an exclamatory Kitri, each phrase ending with a pop! Andrey Uvarov was warm and winning as Basilio.)

In American Ballet Theatre's "Don Quixote," which derives from Petipa's popular 19th century rendition, the dancers are highly presentational. They may dance with one another, but we're the audience that counts. Their desire to wow us - and ours to gratify that wish - can get exhausting.

The Bolshoi's focus stays onstage. In 1900, the Moscow company's choreographer, Alexander Gorsky, applied the naturalistic acting methods of his contemporary, Stanislavsky, to the Petipa ballet. So the dancers are never just performing for us; they're interacting or engaged in a task.

The show abounds in mesmerizing play with props. In a tavern, a mysterious woman in white manipulates her castanets so they develop a life of their own, leading her as if she were a sleepwalker in stiff-legged steps. Two lady troubadours in flowing gowns spread themselves on the floor like lily pads and draw circles overhead with their lutes, as if painting their music.

To be privy to a vibrant world that doesn't depend on us for its life is a real pleasure.


подпись под фото Alexander Fadeechev and Ekaterina Shipulina dance in the Bolshoi Ballet's adaptation of "Don Quixote."
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Оля
Активный участник форума
Активный участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 09.05.2003
Сообщения: 565
Откуда: Москва

СообщениеДобавлено: Пт Июл 22, 2005 3:57 pm    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

А вот очень интересный обзор о труппе БТ, данный на балетном форуме

http://ballettalk.invisionzone.com/index.php?showtopic=20154&st=0

by Michael:

"The look of the company "as a company" is very positive. In training and physique they do seem to be the product of the same academy. The connection between the corps de ballet, the soloists and principals is organic and that is NOT something I've observed recently on that same Met stage. (In fact I would say the opposite -- that there is no organic connection whatsoever at ABT between the corps and the soloists and the principals, or between any of the members of the company, even between the corps members as individuals, and each other).

But back to the Bolshoi Wednesday night. The ensemble dancing, particularly among the women, was the most consistently positive thing about the performance. I'm very happy to have seen this. The smaller ensembles -- Kitri's friends (Stebletsova and Rebetskaya) in Act I; the variation dancers in the Grand Pas (Osipova and Kobakhidze -- the latter in particular is stunning); and the groups of three and four dryads in the Act II Dream were among the best seen all year in NY. Ditto for the large Spanish dances for the massed corps de ballet. That is where you see the company as a whole and that is where their strength lies.

The girls corps de ballet is exquisite: as a group they are beautifully pulled up yet relaxed in the upper body, well matched with each other, and nicely, indeed very nicely musical in their seemingly unified, joyous, relaxed response to the music. Also a good big jump throughout. Among the girls it's a company of jumpers, in fact.

The big jump also goes for Shipulina, last night's Kirti. Just don't look at her feet. (Do look, on the other hand, at the lovely unfolding and easy developee, the big lush poses, and the flexible back). In fact, with a lot of the women at the soloist level, try not to look at their feet. The Bolshoi has always had the reputation that Turn Out doesn't matter and that doesn't seem to have changed. The big exception last night was Maria Allash as the Dryad Queen, who does close fifth position. Or pretty much closes it. With Allash fifth is sort of "four/fifths" but at least consistently so. Allash is a big, strong and lyrical girl and a very good one.

The individual performance to write home about, however, was Nina Kaptsova's as Cupid. This was quite amazing. Beautiful little runs on point, soft and sensitive with her feet, effortless and right on the musical timing. She has the coy look, the slight physique -- you won't see a better Cupid.

A final word about the boys. As a group the legs appear long, meaning the body is slightly longer below the waste than above it and the physical development is not overmuscled. The men appear boyish, elegant, and slender. It is not an effeminate type but it is also not a type that reflects training with weights. The line is refined and somewhat Baroque. The look gives a nice long stretch into fourth position at the finish of phrases, and the footwork among the boys was consistently neat, clear and again musical. The old Bolshoi bravura strength, and sex appeal, on the other hand, are somewhat absent."
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
amber
Заслуженный участник форума
Заслуженный участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 30.08.2004
Сообщения: 1980

СообщениеДобавлено: Сб Июл 23, 2005 12:57 pm    Заголовок сообщения: Большой в США - 2005 Ответить с цитатой

Сегодня в The New York Times появилась еще одна статья по Дон Кихот Большого театра.

Dance Review | 'Don Quixote'
A Showcase for Chivalry and Trouble
By GIA KOURLAS
Published: July 23, 2005

The Bolshoi Ballet's "Don Quixote" is full of the usual tomfoolery involving Kitri, the feisty daughter of an innkeeper, and Basil, a barber, as they valiantly forge a comic path to love and happiness. But for those accustomed to American Ballet Theater's streamlined version, Alexei Fadeechev's production, which continued at the Metropolitan Opera House on Tuesday and Wednesday, features several departures.

While the Don is a more richly rendered character (an improvement), it is nearly impossible to tell the difference among the Street Dancer, Mercedes and Spanish. Basil's fake suicide, with a dagger instead of a razor, occurs early on and doesn't seem all that logical. Why must the lovers run away after Kitri's father, Lorenzo, has already agreed to let them marry? Why does the action shift to a Gypsy encampment, where they aren't even present?

But even though aspects of the Bolshoi's "Don Quixote" are muddled, what lingers are lasting moments of brilliance: radiant lighting; dazzling, gazellelike leaps by the corps member Natalia Osipova; and a joyful Kitri danced by Ekaterina Shipulina on Wednesday.

On Tuesday, Maria Alexandrova, a flamboyant Kitri, overpowered her Basil, Yury Klevtsov. Big-boned and dynamic, with a jump that doesn't so much soar as explode like a firecracker, Ms. Alexandrova, who resembles the actress Fran Drescher, lent the part a brassy charm. Unfortunately, Mr. Klevtsov was a shaky partner in many of the pair's supported pirouettes and lifts.

Ms. Alexandrova shone more brightly on her own in the vision scene, in which Ms. Shipulina, crisp and fluid in her lingering arabesques, was lovely as the Queen of the Dryads. Both Rinat Arifulin as Espada, a toreador, and Anna Antropova as the possessed Gypsy in the first and second acts, were focused and scorching.

On Wednesday, Maria Allash was somewhat flat as the Dryad queen (she made a better street dancer on Tuesday). But nothing could mar the evening with Ms. Shipulina, a leading soloist, as Kitri; though she performs on a smaller scale than Ms. Alexandrova, her portrayal and her dancing were more absolute.

Opposite Andrei Uvarov, whose romantic Basil was captivating, Ms. Shipulina spun through difficult turns and jumps, tempering their intricacy with a natural musicality and an elongated, full-bodied approach. Her performance wasn't perfect, but in an odd way it revealed something vital about ballet. She dropped her fan in the first act, nearly fell out of a supported lift in the third and performed single pirouettes in her whipping fouetté turns, instead of inserting crowd-pleasing doubles or triples. But the details didn't matter. Her Kitri sparkled with life.

The Bolshoi Ballet continues through July 30 at the Metropolitan Opera House, Lincoln Center, (212) 362-6000.

Фотографию мне вставить не удалось, может кто-нибудь сможет исправить мое упущение. Ссылка на источник http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/23/arts/dance/23bols.html?

С уважением, amber
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Ani
Участник форума
Участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 13.05.2003
Сообщения: 305

СообщениеДобавлено: Сб Июл 23, 2005 1:59 pm    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

Фото из статьи, выложенной Amber:




О грядущей «Фараонке»:

The exotic ballet
The Bolshoi takes a new look at 'The Pharaoh's Daughter,' an 1862 ballet with a plot of questionable taste today


New York Newsday
BY APOLLINAIRE SCHERR
July 24, 2005


In its current season at the Metropolitan Opera, the Bolshoi is presenting the greatest 19th century choreographer's first major ballet - or as much as it can bear to.

The Frenchman Marius Petipa is best-known for his Tchaikovsky ballets: "The Nutcracker," "Swan Lake" and "The Sleeping Beauty." But he also perfected the exotic ballet, set in the trampled outposts of the British Empire and other, fantastical realms. These enormous spectacles unite lions, monkeys and camels with ghoulish holy men, ballerinas with veils plopped over their heads, Moors or Turks who are invariably bad or stupid or both.

"The Pharaoh's Daughter" premiered at the Imperial Ballet of Russia in 1862, as the Suez Canal's imminent construction was giving rise to the latest wave of Egyptomania. An Englishman is touring the pyramids when he comes upon a caravan of Armenian tradesmen who invite him to lunch. Topping off the meal with a strong smoke, the impressionable tourist hallucinates his way back to the ancient dynasties, where he becomes Taor and catches the eye of Aspicia, daughter of the pharaoh.

Their instantaneous love runs up against various obstacles - mainly, the vexing fact that he is a loin-clothed nothing and she is the most powerful (and best-dressed) lady in the land. Fleeing her father's vast palace, they visit a dank tomb, a Nile fishing village and a craggy underwater kingdom where each of the world's major rivers demonstrates its home country's national dance. The original production lasted 4 1/2 hours and featured a cast of 400: an enormous retinue of slaves, spear-wielding huntsmen, three dozen children popping out of flower baskets teetering on dancers' heads and the entire pantheon of Egyptian gods.

All the exotic ballet ingredients are here: epic proportions, ludicrous plot, romanticized natives and a jumble of epochs and nations.

So what's to like?

Reviving 'exotic' ballets

For the "imaginative re-creation" that debuts here this week by the story-ballet specialist Pierre Lacotte, the piece has shed 300 dancers and 90 minutes. But we're still in an improbable Egypt. Isn't resurrecting even this faint facsimile like trying to do Cecil B. DeMille all over again, as if we'd learned nothing in the interim about portraying people other than ourselves?

Exotic ballets may have been massively popular in their day - "The Pharaoh's Daughter" was performed more than 100 times during Petipa's lifetime. But when they die, shouldn't we take that as a sign? "The Pharaoh's Daughter" was buried in 1928. The Soviets must have been embarrassed by its celebration of grandeur built on the backs of slaves. Shouldn't we be, too? Or, as with Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice," does a vein of gold pulse beneath the dumb surface?

This is a huge question for our major classical ballet companies, which have the resources to consider reconstructions, "imaginative" or otherwise. The story ballets are the companies' big draws. They're still what ballet means to most people. With few contemporary ballet choreographers creating full-length narrative dances, artistic directors find themselves rummaging around in the warehouse to see what they can make of the relics.

New versions abound

In the past few years, not only the Bolshoi but also the Kirov, that other illustrious Russian company, and our own American Ballet Theatre have all presented new versions of old, far-flung favorites. What do these adaptations tell us about the value of exoticism?

In the case of the new "Pharaoh's Daughter," not much. While it still features a large corps and many costume changes, it skirts the issue of "Egypt." In charming pas de deux, bright with delicate small jumps and surprising shifts in direction, the choreographer focuses on the romance. The locale is mere decoration.

According to Alexei Ratmansky, the most recent of five artistic directors at the Bolshoi in the past 10 years, "the exotic setting isn't important." Ratmansky, 36, is a promising choreographer whose resurrection of the 1935 "The Bright Stream" is one of the most anticipated works of the season.

"The Pharaoh's Daughter," he explained with some exasperation, "has a very eclectic, very stupid plot. What matters is how Petipa developed his choreographic ideas. It's a very complicated and classical system of expression, refined by centuries. Of course it's not the stories."

It's only the ballet

American Ballet Theatre would seem to agree. In recent years, it has brought us reworkings of the pirate-slave ballet "Le Corsaire," set in a turbaned Turkey, and the medieval romance "Raymonda," in which a girl's heart is divided between a stiff white knight and his sexy Arab double. As adapted by Anna-Marie Holmes, neither ballet seems the least bit interested in its surroundings.

The steps are what count. There are so many that you grow hungry for mime. In the originals, the character of the dancing communicated who people were: their temperaments and their social positions. But to suggest a type - and without words one has to start with types - the ballet would inevitably approach caricature, a risk today's artistic directors aren't willing to take. So the ballets are done in a homogenous classical key. The dancing is sometimes louder, for the many bravado sequences, and sometimes softer, for the lyrical moments, but, except for the villains and their minions, it lacks texture.

When does the setting matter?

Both American Ballet Theatre and the Bolshoi seem simply to have ransacked the old ballets for the skeletons of their plots. The exoticism doesn't concern them - and, from watching the ballets, it's not at all clear why it should. Its shadowy presence only reminds us of a benighted former age.

Only with the Kirov's meticulous restoration of the 1900 "La Bayad- ère," presented by the Lincoln Center Festival and the Met in 2002, does the Orientalist setting begin to make sense.

As with most of these ballets, "La Bayadère," set in India with all-Indian characters, is a love story between social unequals. A princely warrior falls for a temple dancer but betrays her for the princess to whom he was promised at birth.

The Kirov reconstruction presents an intricate social hierarchy in which each individual or group has its signature moves. The vengeful High Brahmin devours the stage in Groucho-like steps. The temple dancers bend their legs in voluptuous attitudes to match their sinuous arms. The court dancers balance stuffed parrots on their fingertips while winding deep-blue ribbons around their calves.

With all the ranks of society present, we feel the full difficulty of our doomed lovers' pursuit of a happiness that defies that society. While the audience of Russian nobles certainly shared the values that would compel a prince to marry a princess, the foreign setting enabled them to see those values as rules that people had made up and could break. All of these people belong together on the stage. Why shouldn't two of them love?

The exotic ballet has added freight to its Romantic predecessor.

By the 1800s, ballet had begun to reflect the new spirit of liberty, equality and fraternity. The protagonists were no longer Greco-Roman gods but Gypsies, servants, Creole slaves, milkmaids and wayward daughters. The dancing alternated between folk and classical, with the best dancers often assigned the peasant steps.

The Romantic obsession with folk culture didn't just mark the triumph of the lower echelons; it celebrated the budding notion of a nation, which rose up from its people. The folk dance embodied "national idiosyncrasies," as the renowned teacher Carlo Blasis explained in an 1820 dance treatise. Each step was imbued with a nation's "style and spirit."

Self-determination

If a people could be self-determined, why not individuals? From "La Fille Mal Gardée" (1786) to "Giselle" (1841) and beyond, the ballet freed its heroines to ascend and descend the social ladder in the name of love. More often than not, the results were tragic, but even to imagine a self-chosen marriage was liberatingly novel. The exotic ballet wrapped the cross-class romance in an opulent society to flatter its noble audience's sense of entitlement. But it also increased the stakes of the story, and often its poignancy.

To save rather than gut the emancipatory impulse at the ballet's heart, artistic directors and their "imaginative re-creators" must start getting imaginative. Let them change the characters' signature steps now that a somersaulting Sambo won't do; they could invent a new nation if the name "India" or "Egypt" is too stained with sordid imperialist history. For a brief moment in the world of the 19th century stage, everyone showed up and moved in his own way. The spectacle of such harmony will always be dreamy and beautiful, like ballet itself, and it's worth preserving.



Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Ani
Участник форума
Участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 13.05.2003
Сообщения: 305

СообщениеДобавлено: Сб Июл 23, 2005 3:33 pm    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

Гастроли балета Большого театра в Нью-Йорке

Новое русское слово
07.23.2005

Дальний и ближний подходы к кассам Метрополитен-оперы были запружены народом. На дальнем спрашивали лишние билетики, на ближнем пытались достояться в длинной змеевидной очереди к кассам, где тех, кто побеспокоился заранее, уже ожидали драгоценные, но пока недоступные "пропуска в рай".

Места в "раю", то бишь в зале, оказались полностью раскуплены и розданы: наряду с "простой публикой" их заняла пресса, представленная в полном составе, а также всякого рода знаменитости (хореограф Джон Ноймайер, перенесший не так давно в Большой свой балет "Сон в летнюю ночь", и Михаил Барышников в их числе) и богатые американские покровители балета (в частности, члены совета директоров Американского балетного театра, хотя сами артисты балета уже отправились на гастроли). В общем, как и ожидалось, открытие гастролей балета Большого театра, прибывшего в Нью-Йорк вместе с собственным оркестром, вызвало большой ажиотаж и большие ожидания.

В своей заметке по случаю открытия гастролей я писала, что имя Большого все еще имеет особый статус, несмотря на не всегда удачные гастроли, на постоянную чехарду с руководством (Григорович, Васильев/Фадеечев, Рождественский/Акимов, Иксанов/Ратманский), на нерасторжимую связь в течение десятилетий с "официозом" и "советским стилем", то бишь с помпезностью в сценическом стиле, а также с протекционизмом, интригами, коррупцией – в организационном. Несмотря ни на что, спектакль "Большого балета" всегда обещал ошеломляющую виртуозность, яркую зрелищность, сильные эмоции.

Сохранилось ли все это? И как будет выглядеть в сравнении с более сдержанным и рафинированным стилем Мариинского, гастроли которого в рамках фестиваля Линкольн-центра еще свежи в памяти? И не покажется ли здешнему зрителю (в том числе и российско-советского происхождения), уже привыкшему в танце если не к большей виртуозности, то к большей естественности и меньшему пафосу, этот "большой стиль" чересчур "велеречивым"? А солисты? Николай Цискаридзе – танцовщик высшего разряда, этуаль – без сомнений, но вошел ли он в идеальную форму после жестокой травмы? И будет ли Андрей Уваров так же хорош, как лучшие "латинские мальчики" АБТ? И смогут ли приблизиться Светлана Захарова, Мария Александрова, Светлана Лунькина, Анна Антоничева – примы сегодняшнего Большого – к уровню Дианы Вишневой или Ульяны Лопаткиной?

А репертуар? Что такое "Светлый ручей" на музыку Шостаковича? Или "Дочь фараона"? И как повлияло на труппу появление в ней нового главного хореографа – бывшего киевлянина, выпускника Московского хореографического училища, бывшего жителя Канады, ведущего солиста Датского королевского балета, автора более чем 30 балетных постановок Алексея Ратманского? Вопросы, вопросы...

В "Дон Кихоте", которым балет Большого театра открывал свои гастроли в Америке (они включают еще несколько спектаклей в Калифорнии – в Коста-Месе, Филадельфии и окрестностях Вашингтона), самым интересным для меня было сравнение двух "мариинских" танцовщиц, бывшей и нынешней, почти столкнувшихся в Нью-Йорке в роли Китри: прима-балерина Мариинского Диана Вишнева, выступившая месяц тому назад в спектакле "Дон Кихот" АБТ, произвела сенсацию не только беспрецедентной техникой, но и блеском и изяществом актерского перевоплощения. А Светлана Захарова, некогда юное дарование с фантастическими виртуозными данными, четыре года назад открывавшее гастроли Мариинского в Нью-Йорке в роли Авроры в "Спящей", была "уведена" в Москву в 2003 году и теперь открывала гастроли Большого в "Дон Кихоте".

Придется признать: при всей ослепительной технике, при всей скорости, стабильности, легкости, которые демонстрировала высокая, длинноногая Захарова с начала и до окончания спектакля, вызвав этим, вполне заслуженно, восторженный рев зала, ее выступление, по сути, демонстрацией техники и осталось. Не покидало впечатление, что перед нами не актриса, создающая своим танцем образ, характер или хотя бы обыгрывающая ситуацию, а танцовщица, которая просто хорошо знает и добросовестно выполняет все, что надо делать в тот или иной момент согласно рисунку ее роли, – в то время как всем своим существом она сосредоточена на том, чтобы все увидели и оценили ее огромные "растяжки" (хотя "нога за ухом" часто выглядит совсем неэстетично и в классическом балете далеко не всегда уместна), ее уникальные фуэте (в последнем акте), невесомые взлеты в поддержках и так далее, и тому подобное.

Да, виртуозность в балете сама по себе заслуживает восхищения, но если уж в фигурном катании ставят отметки за "артистизм", то на настоящей театральной сцене этой стороне исполнения стоит уделить больше внимания. Захарова же даже на партнера поглядывала лишь "по мере крайней необходимости", главным же образом танцевала "в зал", на публику.

Ее Базиль – Андрей Уваров – высокий, с густой русой шевелюрой (в угоду образу и вкусу ее стоило бы получше "сформировать"), был Захаровой под стать: элегантный, стабильный партнер и солист и не очень интересный актер. Во всяком случае, совсем не такой горячий, как Корелла или Акоста из АБТ.

Зато другие солисты и кордебалет оправдали самые лучшие ожидания. Анна Антоничева в роли Королевы Дриад, изумительная, блистательно техничная и очень женственная Наталья Осипова в первой вариации из Гран Па (последний акт), игривая Нина Капцова в роли Купидона, Анна Антропова – Цыганка – с ее необыкновенно выразительными руками и умением "прожечь" своим темпераментом зал до последнего ряда, очаровательные подружки Китри (Ольга Стеблецова и Анна Ребецкая), Тимофей Лавренюк в роли Эспады и Ирина Зиброва в роли Мерседес плюс группы матадоров, цыганок, крестьянок, дриад, красочно одетых, необыкновенно живых, легких, отточено-дружных – все это слилось в на редкость яркий, сочный, щедрый праздник танца, характерного, классического, группового, индивидуального.

Большой, считающий "Дон Кихот" своей визитной карточкой (Петипа ставил его именно в Большом, и прославленная редакция Горского родилась там же), показывает сейчас редакцию А.Фадеечева (1999 г.), собравшую, кажется, все, что было можно, из редакций предыдущих. Тут и многочисленные пантомимические сцены Дон Кихота и Санчо (А.Лопаревич и А.Петухов), и танцы в таверне, и Герцог с супругой и подданными, и снова танцы, танцы, танцы – в новых, красивых, сверкающих блестками костюмах, на фоне традиционных рисованных декораций, которые к сожалению хороши только в прологе и первой картине (Сергей Бархин), а в остальных кажутся пыльно-старомодными.

Да, только Большой и Мариинский с их гигантскими и превосходно наученными труппами могут осилить сегодня нечто подобное, и в изобилии, в щедрой зрелищности такой многолюдной редакции есть своя прелесть и к тому же историческая ценность. АБТ с этим никак не справиться и такого качества "танцевального фона" не добиться и в десять лет (особенно с сегодняшним состоянием финансов). Но пантомимы в редакции Большого, пожалуй, слишком много, смысла она не добавляет, зато выглядит порой чересчур наигранной. Более короткая редакция АБТ, пусть и выглядит скромнее, зато логичнее, современнее – и позволяет блистать звездам-солистам.

И, наконец, оркестр. Прославленный оркестр Большого театра – о, с каким нетерпением я ждала его роскошного, сочного, полного звучания, по которому так соскучилась, слушая игру жидковатых американских балетных оркестриков! Что ж, сочность, насыщенность звучания, виртуозность солистов – все это было. Но баланс был нехорош, и общий тон игры – грубоватый, "бряцающий", порой неряшливый. Впрочем, у оркестра было полтора дня, чтобы приспособиться к акустике Мет. Надеюсь, что сегодня он уже звучит совсем иначе.

Теперь – о том, что нас ждет сегодня и на следующей неделе.

"Спартак" Арама Хачатуряна, давний любимец как нашей, так и западной публики, который идет на сцене Мет вслед за "Дон Кихотом", – легендарный спектакль Юрия Григоровича, сенсация советских времен, со сложнейшими мужскими партиями, требующими мощи и умения создать героический образ. В памяти – Владимир Васильев и Марис Лиепа, Михаил Лавровский, Борис Акимов, Ирек Мухаммедов. На сей раз в роли Спартака выступают опытные Сергей Белоголовцев и Андрей Клевцов. Говорят, что особое внимание стоит обратить на третьего Спартака – молодого танцовщика Александра Воробьева, которому пророчат большое будущее.

Что же касается балета "Светлый ручей", то его историю стоит напомнить хотя бы вкратце. Только сначала процитируем постановщика Алексея Ратманского: "Гениальная партитура "Светлого ручья" давно меня привлекала. Постановку балета я оговаривал еще с Геннадием Рождественским, когда он возглавлял Большой театр. Новое руководство Большого приняло проект без возражений, ведь "Светлый ручей" – часть истории ГАБТа. В балете изумительная музыка с очень выразительными характеристиками персонажей и очень театральное либретто, сделанное профессионально, – это любовный водевиль с переодеванием, такой жанр имеет давние корни в балете: достаточно вспомнить "Тщетную предосторожность" и "Коппелию". От артистов в спектакле мне хотелось добиться искреннего оптимизма, широты и энергии – того, что есть в музыке".

"Светлый ручей" – третий балет композитора. Сочиненный в 1935 году следом за "Золотым веком" и "Болтом", поставленный Федором Лопуховым на либретто Адриана Пиотровского, он был восторженно принят в Ленинграде, а после премьеры в Большом – и в Москве. Но тут началась антиформалистическая кампания № 1, Шостакович попал под огонь критики за "Леди Макбет Мценского уезда", и балет попался под руку: в феврале 1936 года появилась очередная редакционная статья в "Правде", разнесшая в пух и прах невинный танцевальный водевиль из жизни колхоза "Светлый ручей", в который на праздник уборки урожая прибыла пара столичных классических танцоров. Статья называлась "Балетная фальшь", авторов обвинили в издевательстве над светлыми идеалами тружеников села, балет сняли с афиши и больше к нему не обращались. Шостакович создал на основе его музыки очередную балетную сюиту, и зритель, пришедший сейчас в Мет, услышит много знакомых мелодий: балетные сюиты целиком и отдельными частями часто исполнялись в концертах, по радио, использовались в телепрограммах и кино.

В постановке Ратманского партитура сжата до двух актов, но либретто старое: время действия – все те же 1930-е годы, место действия – тот же колхоз. Все разыгрывается вокруг трех пар влюбленных. Постановщик создал вереницу танцевальных миниатюр и дивертисментов с явными признаками балетного "капустника", со множеством остроумных находок и комических парафраз, который оценят знатоки балетной классики. Декорации и костюмы – Бориса Мессерера, чьи старшие родственники Асаф и Суламифь Мессерер танцевали главные партии в той, первой, постановке.

Еще одна загадка гастролей – "Дочь фараона". Во всех мемуарах из более чем ста балетов, поставленных Петипа, "Дочь фараона" на музыку Цезаря Пуни (1862 г.) упоминается как один из самых значительных. Так это или нет, сегодня сказать трудно: поскольку "Дочь фараона", в отличие от "Спящей" или от "Щелкунчика", надолго исчезла из репертуара, передачи "из ног в ноги" не было, и традиция прервалась. Француз Пьер Лакотт, хореограф нынешнего спектакля и специалист по восстановлениям старинных балетов, за аутентичность ручаться не может. Это, скорее, очень добротная имитация не только хореографии Петипа, но и самого стиля большого экзотического зрелища.

Сделан спектакль с огромным размахом и может считаться триумфом постановочной группы. Во всяком случае, декорации и костюмы производят на зрителей сильное впечатление. Музыка Цезаря Пуни (с добавлениями из других авторов того же стиля и ряда) -- приятная, незатейливая, чем-то похожая на "Баядерку", да и сюжет такой же условный, тоже из экзотического далека, со снами и опиумом, и еще более нелепый (основан на произведении Теофиля Готье). Герой – английский лорд. Пары опиума и близость пирамид навеяли ему грезы о древнем Египте и романе с дочерью фараона, которую он, лорд Уилсон, якобы должен спасти от брака с королем нубийским.

Одна из причин, по которой стоит посмотреть этот спектакль, – его первый состав: Захарова, Цискаридзе, Александрова, заявленный на 28 и 30 июля. Поклонники Николая Цискаридзе могут увидеть его и в балете "Светлый ручей". Приятных впечатлений!
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Михаил Александрович
Модератор
Модератор


Зарегистрирован: 06.05.2003
Сообщения: 18627
Откуда: Москва

СообщениеДобавлено: Вс Июл 24, 2005 12:33 am    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

О московском «ДК» и первом спектакле пишет также Нина Аловерт в «Русском базаре» (ГК 2005072303):
Цитата:
Первое представление “Дон-Кихота” танцевали премьеры театра — международная звезда Светлана Захарова и Андрей Уваров. С блеском и мастерством они исполнили па-де-де в последнем акте. Среди неизвестных мне молодых танцовщиц я бы прежде всего отметила двух цветочниц — “подруг Китри”, красивых и обаятельных Ольгу Стеблецову и Анну Ребетскую, затем Наталию Осипову в первой вариации последнего акта (танцовщица обладает великолепным прыжком), грациозную Нелли Кобахидзе во второй вариации и Нину Капцову в партии Амура. Среди исполнительниц характерных танцев выделялась Анна Антропова (цыганский танец), хотя и все остальные характерные танцовщицы оставили хорошее впечатление.
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение Отправить e-mail
Оля
Активный участник форума
Активный участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 09.05.2003
Сообщения: 565
Откуда: Москва

СообщениеДобавлено: Вс Июл 24, 2005 10:18 pm    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

Появился отзыв на первый Спартак (Клевцов – Антоничева - Волчков – Аллаш)
Пишет Poohtunia http://www.ballet-dance.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=23979

Just back from the Bolshoi’s opening of Spartacus. What a wonderful, wonderful evening. I hardly know where to start.

The Met Opera House was packed. In this city, the Russian/Georgian community supports its performing artists like no other community. Whether it’s the Bolshoi Ballet or Hvorostovsky singing at the Met or the Russian National Orchestra at Avery Fisher Hall, the community comes out in droves. Tonight I saw what looked like three generations of some families there together. And many more wheelchair attendees than usual. It was a very full house with many, many seniors.

The Bolshoi Orchestra was superb. The brass sound was huge, and the clarinet soloist made my heart sing. The Playbill listed the names of 14 of the soloist musicians on the cast page. A nice touch of class. Speaking of the Playbill, the cast page identified the evening’s performance by The Bolshoi Theatre of Russia in the largest print with the Bolshoi Ballet in much smaller print. What we saw tonight was, indeed, very big theater.

Spartacus, of course, is an evening length contemporary ballet. I can imagine how it must have rocked the ballet world when Grigorovich introduced his version, his vision if you will. It was so contrary to what preceded it, so in-your-face unconventional. It still looks imaginative, even after decades of seeing subsequent choreographers’ efforts which may have been born from Grigorovich’s ideas. My only complaint is that there were too many renverses for everyone.

This evening I really wasn’t in the mood to see a drama about the violence of insurgents rising up and being beaten back down. Were it not for the fact that I’d spent $60 on the ticket, I may have stayed home. However, eight bars into the Khachaturian score I was hypnotized. I just cannot describe how wonderful this orchestra’s music was.

The principals this evening were Yury Klevtsov (Spartacus), Alexander Volchkov (Crassus), Anna Antonicheva (Phrygia), and Maria Allash (Aegina). I’d never seen any of them perform before and therefore, have nothing with which to compare their performances. I thought they were all wonderful, especially Klevtsov. His drama-infused dancing was so powerful. He and Antonicheva were beautiful together, especially in some of their spectacular one-armed lifts which literally threw me to the back of my seat. Volchkov was fabulous as Crassus. One knew that the character was cruel and dangerous, but there was something about him that made one want to like him. Maybe it was his blondish curls, but I suspect it was his skilled portrayal. Allash was a very strong Aegina. She really threw her heart and soul into the role, and very effectively. However, she has those knees that have a tendency to not look straight even when they are straight, and not particularly appealing feet. Therefore, when she performed a grand jete or threw her leg up to 180, it was less than pretty. Antonicheva, on the other hand, looked quite wonderful at 180 and in every other position. I truly enjoyed her every minute on stage in this contemporary format, and would love to see her in Petipa. All of the dancing--the corps, the soloists, the principals--was super. What a wonderful company!

I noticed a couple of other interesting things. One was that the Bolshoi opened up the back of the Met stage and used about 20 more feet than was covered by the huge dance flooring! The dancers had no problem using the entire space. Another thing I noticed was that none of the dancers wore double ribbons or tons of elastic to hold their shoes on. I saw two or three corps members with a very thin piece of elastic sewn at the heel, but certainly nothing like what you see in this country - mile wide ribbons, four on a shoe, with multiple elastic bands.

Finally, as I was going down the escalator on my way out of the Met, one of the soloists (a Shepherd with an infectious grin and spectacular temps de fleche up to his forehead) came bounding up the steps in the opposite direction with his curls sticking out from under a baseball cap. Some people in front of me recognized him as one of the dancers and shouted “Nice job.” Then others on the escalator said the same thing. He was surprised and delighted to be recognized, and skipped up the steps and out the front of the Met into the crowd.
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Оля
Активный участник форума
Активный участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 09.05.2003
Сообщения: 565
Откуда: Москва

СообщениеДобавлено: Пн Июл 25, 2005 10:06 am    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

Статья о Спартаках в Нью Йорк Таймс

July 25, 2005, The New York Times
A Soviet-Era Vision of a Rebellion by Roman Slaves
By JOHN ROCKWELL


We had "Astarte"; they had "Spartacus." American grooviness, however crudely manipulated, versus Soviet triumphalism. The Soviet Union was riding high in 1968. There were those scary displays of bellicose hardware in Red Square, and the Soviets were still holding their own in the space race (Neil Armstrong hadn't yet stepped on the moon).

"Spartacus" was the perfect Soviet allegory. Based on an actual slave rebellion in Italy in the first century B.C., it mirrored the Marxist vision of a virtuous underclass fighting to free itself from decadent rulers. Yuri Grigorovich's definitive ballet version was seen in Moscow in 1968 and widely praised, a praise echoed in its first Western appearances in London the following year. By then there had already been Bolshoi Ballet versions, to the same scenario and the same Khatchaturian music, by Leonid Jacobson (seen disastrously in New York in 1962) and Igor Moiseyev. Not to speak of Stanley Kubrick's film version from 1960.
It took until 1975 for the Bolshoi to bring the Grigorovich staging to New York, and shortly thereafter it was immortalized in a widely seen film. For a ballet so iconic, and still regularly in the Bolshoi repertory, it comes as shock to realize that the company hadn't done "Spartacus" in New York for 30 years.

That was rectified on Friday and twice on Saturday at the Metropolitan Opera House, part of the Bolshoi's two-week Met engagement (and forthcoming two-week American tour).

Thirty years is a long time. One wondered how Mr. Grigorovich's choreography would hold up. And how today's Bolshoi dancers, so different from their Soviet predecessors, would dance it. The answers are O.K. and O.K.

Mr. Grigorovich's "Spartacus" is a grand cinematic spectacle, full of leaps and loves and betrayals and brilliant tableaus and lots and lots of macho stomping about by soldiers and slaves and shepherds. Khachaturian's score, cut and revised for Mr. Grigorovich, is similarly cinematic; in other words, it often sounds like movie music. At its best, it's Shostakovich without the genius. But Lord knows it's vigorous.

All this offended more refined sensibilities in 1975 and continues to offend them now. For more populist types, "Spartacus" can be enjoyed for what it is. Mr. Grigorovich steers largely clear of conventional ballet mime; his "Spartacus" is full of actual choreography, however martial. The odd thing is how readily he falls back on standard ballet steps and moves.
But whatever impression the ballet can make today is inseparable from how it's danced. Bolshoi dancers back then were more full-blooded (and full-bodied) than they are today. Strong, muscular men leaping to impossible heights; willowy yet assertive women capable of amazing contortions.

That stereotype seems true in general but in need of modification for "Spartacus." Yes, the Bolshoi corps back then stuck out their chests with more manly self-assurance than today's prancy successors. Although the Three Shepherds, common to all three performances, were terrific, Spartaci in training.

Vladimir Vasiliev, the incontestable supreme Spartacus of yore, was not an unusually muscled man. He leapt high, but what he really did was project a thrilling intensity. Similarly, Maris Liepa as the evil Crassus achieved his effects as much through his sneering hauteur as his strutting dancing.

There are only four main characters in this ballet, and they are sharply, not to say cartoonishly, delineated. Spartacus is noble, strong and loving; Crassus is pure evil. Spartacus's wife, Phrygia, is femme yet brave. And Crassus' courtesan, Aegina, is a showy vamp.

I never saw Ekaterina Maximova, the 1968 Phyrgia, but Natalia Bessmertnova in 1975 and in the film was near ideal, and Nina Timofeyeva slithered about with as much personality as the character of Aegina allows.

Today's Bolshoi dancers are slimmer, sometimes downright skinny. Most of them don't fill out Simon Virsaladze's sexy late-60's Roman costumes (everyone wears mini-skirts). (His now-faded sets are still being used, too.) Yet many of the dancers this weekend conveyed the ballet well enough to let us see what Mr. Grigorovich had in mind.

Dmitri Belogolovtsev was to have danced the title role on Friday night, but in the shufflings common to ballet-company casting, he dropped out. The result was that the veteran Yury Klevtsov did Spartacus both Friday and Saturday nights, and he was just fine. He can jump and twist with authority, he has a ripped torso and he handled the spectacular one-handed lifts with aplomb (as did his liftees). Like Mr. Vasiliev, he projects manly strength; he articulated Mr. Grigorovich's insistent stentorian gestures with enough conviction to purge their inherent risibility.
Alexander Vorobiev on Saturday afternoon never convinced me that his posing was more than that. He may well be superb in classical repertory, but here he was a ballet dancer, not a heroic slave.

All three Phrygias were good. Anna Antonicheva danced elegantly on Friday, but lacked glamour. On Saturday night, Svetlana Lunkina danced even better, and had grand ballerina pathos. Nina Kaptsova at the Saturday matinee best conveyed classic line, glamour and sexiness.
The two exponents of Crassus - Saturday evening's principals were the same as Friday's except Ms. Lunkina - fell decisively short of Mr. Liepa's model, although Alexander Volchkov seemed more confident and evilly oily than Vladimir Neporozny managed at the matinee. Conversely, Ekaterina Shipulina at the matinee did more with the improbable part of Aegina than did Maria Allash.

Khatchaturian's music may be tacky, but Pavel Sorokin drew forceful, confident playing from the Bolshoi Orchestra. Their contributions did as much as the dancing to make Mr. Grigorovich's "Spartacus," a true child of its time, sustain its viability for audiences today.
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Ani
Участник форума
Участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 13.05.2003
Сообщения: 305

СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 26, 2005 12:52 am    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

Over the Top, and Nobody Does It Better

"Don Quixote”
Bolshoi Ballet
Metropolitan Opera House
New York, NY
July 18, 2005

DanceView Times
by Leigh Witchel


The Bolshoi opened its New York season with a tried and true favorite; its megawatt production of "Don Quixote." It's more fun than a barrel of Russo-Spanish monkeys.

The dancers wear the ballet like a second skin. They ought to feel comfortable; it's their ballet. Petipa created the original production on the Bolshoi in 1869; Alexander Gorsky mounted a revised version for the company in 1900 that's the basis of current productions. This production, mounted in 1999, is by Alexei Fadeyechev.

After a prologue with the Don the lights blazed up on a sunny Spanish courtyard populated by some of the blondest Russian girls in all of Spain. There’s just enough plot with the love story of Kitri and Basilio to hold together a magnificent suite of character-influenced dances; they come one after another like waves.

Our Kitri was the prodigious Svetlana Zakharova. Kitri is an extroverted role, but it’s a surprise how Zakharova takes to this; in New York we’ve seen her in the icy white adagio roles such as Odette and “Diamonds”. She burst onto the stage and circled it; relishing the movement and relishing showing herself to us. The Bolshoi has not tamed Zakharova’s freak show extensions; they are still very much in evidence and border on the gynecological. In Act II, Zakharova flirtatiously pulled down her skirt for modesty during a comic moment in a lift. We’ve seen far more than that already, why bother? The vulgarity is one problem, but how vulgar can one call Zakharova’s extensions in a production where Mercedes folds herself in half backwards? The bigger problem is that the sky-high extensions don’t work, especially in the Act II vision and the grand pas in Act III. When a woman actually can lift her leg to 180°, she loses a dimension in space. She’s a vertical line; all Y-axis with no X-axis left.

Her Basilio was Andrey Uvarov. He’s built just as long as she and can handle her; a great virtue. Uvarov is not a pyrotechnician; in the Act III pas de deux, he did a mere double assemblé where we’ve gotten used to seeing triple whoop-de-doos. But everything he did, he did decently with a genial presence and sunny acting. His “suicide” in Act II was charming and funny. His chemistry with Zakharova was also more charming than sizzling. From a game of footsie she played with him in Act I to his flirting with her friends when she ignored him, both gave as good as they got.

Supporting character performances were unsurprisingly strong. Alexey Loparevich gave real dignity to the Don even within the comedy and Alexander Petukhov was a great second banana as Sancho Panza. Timofey Lavrenyuk is all glitter, flaring nostrils and swirling capes as Espada. He had magnificent cape technique, but the best moment was when an attendant removed his gold brocade cape after his entrance and another attendant came out to give him a red and white silk cape to dance with. When you’re Espada, one cape is never enough. Similarly, one knows that Zakharova is the star of the ballet because she’s the only one who seemed to have time to change her entire outfit on the way to the tavern when everyone else is wearing the same clothing. The stupefyingly flexible Irina Zibirova stunned us all in the tavern scene, only to be outdone by Anna Antropova’s gypsy dance, which involved hurling guitars willy-nilly, sliding wildly on the ground in a backbend and if possible, going over the top of Over The Top.

With character roles like this, classical parts can look pale. Anna Antonicheva has sparkled more as Kitri than she did as in this performance as Queen of the Dryads, but Nina Kaptsova’s fleet-footed performance as Cupid was adorable without being cloying. Two female variations punctuate the Act III grand pas. In the first, Natalia Osipova sailed through the air in amazing jumps, but with little concern for form or style. It might as well have been the 100 meter hurdle rather than a classical variation. In contrast, Nelli Kobakhidze’s performance in the second variation was clean with elegant port de bras.

The Bolshoi corps' timing was impeccable as the dancers entered haughtily in couples for Act III. They walked a few steps and raised their hands in unison with flourish, like a peacock fanning its tail. Their character dancing seemed fueled by boundless energy. Even when not dancing, they are a crowd par excellence. No one works capes better and they have the best fans in the business.

The production is glorious in its energy but verges on being overdone and can get dizzying. My memory may be playing tricks on me, but it feels like they added a few capes and fans since I last saw it, if that were even possible. But if you’re in the mood for its joyous vulgarities, the Bolshoi’s "Don Quixote" proves that Oscar Wilde was right. Nothing succeeds like excess.

copyright ©2005 by Leigh Witchel


Последний раз редактировалось: Ani (Вт Июл 26, 2005 1:00 am), всего редактировалось 1 раз
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Ani
Участник форума
Участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 13.05.2003
Сообщения: 305

СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 26, 2005 12:59 am    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

Form or Force

“Spartacus”
Bolshoi Ballet
Metropolitan Opera House
New York, NY
July 22, 2005

DanceView Times
by Leigh Witchel


The Bolshoi continued its New York season with a ballet on which they have an even stronger claim than “Don Quixote”: Yuri Grigorovich’s “Spartacus”. Both ballets are showcases for ensemble dancing that the Bolshoi performs with the energy of a pile driver, but the similarities end there.

“Spartacus” is the tale of the leader of a heroic but failed uprising of Roman slaves against their masters. It focuses on two couples: Spartacus and his wife Phrygia, and Crassus, the degenerate leader of the Roman Army, and his concubine Aegina. Behind them the corps de ballet, especially the men, provide a sweeping and powerful backdrop. It’s been a signature work for the Bolshoi since its premiere in 1968 and the performances of its original cast (Vladimir Vasiliev, Yekaterina Maximova, Maris Liepa and Nina Timofeyeva) are the stuff of legend.

This isn’t the first version of the ballet. That was done in 1956 by Leonid Jakobsen for the Kirov. A version for the Bolshoi by Igor Moiseyev was made in 1958. It was not shown on their first tour to the US the following year; it wasn’t presented here until 1962. But here’s an exchange between the Bolshoi’s chief choreographer, Leonid Lavrovsky, and George Balanchine from that first tour. The Bolshoi dancers had been shown rehearsals of “Agon” and been baffled.

[Lavrovsky] “You know, in the Soviet Union work such as yours would be condemned as mere formalism, as inhuman.”

To which Balanchine replied, “Well, I’m certainly not interested in using beautiful dance movement and gesture as merely a caption for some silly story.”

Putting aside the hyperbole in both men’s remarks, the divide between where American and Soviet ballet headed is clear, and if “Agon” is Exhibit A for one side, “Spartacus” is the same for the other.

The corps de ballet in “Spartacus” mostly dances in unison, straight at us in powerful leaps or marches. This is a ballet about combat and rebellion; the corps de ballet and the military battalion corps do not seem far apart. There’s no counterpoint or pure dance—every dance is a pas d’action. The solos the four main characters dance as bridges between scenes are not variations; they’re soliloquies. Grigorovich is not aiming for form, or the meaning in form. This is dance for narrative expression.

It's also socialist realism. The story has obvious resonance to the Left and Grigorovich gives it a nationalist spin as well. The dances for the shepherds and rebels in "Spartacus" have the same bravura, pride and familiarity to their native audience as the dances for heroic partisans of Igor Moiseyev's own folk troupe. Those massed ensembles can whip up a real frenzy. Even the bows in character at the end of each act worked the audience into a state. This is a ballet not of Form, but of Force.

The Bolshoi’s current production still whips up a frenzy and the quartet of main roles were danced with power and conviction, if little concern for form or line. The Bolshoi as a company seems to have an ambivalent relationship with transition steps and only a glancing acquaintance with fifth position. Spartacus’s leaps were with unstretched legs and bent knees, but they were also as high as he could possibly make them.

Yury Klevtsov as Spartacus was the Soviet hero as Everyman. Earnest and powerful, he leapt across the stage with his legs scissoring or pumped Phrygia over his head. Alexander Volchkov as his nemesis Crassus was a fitting opponent; putting priority less on steps than on being as gloating and evil as he could. The role of Phyrgia seems the smallest of the quartet, but that could also be the difficulty of playing the Good Stalwart Heroine whose job in the ballet is to suffer, worry or wait. None of these tasks are particularly interesting to portray on stage, but Anna Antonicheva did them all with long, lovely lines. The plum role for the woman is Aegina, even though she gets lowest billing of the leads. What scheming and glamorous villainess isn’t more interesting on stage than a patient and virtuous heroine? With her glamour poses with one arm cocked overhead like a frieze, the role is also a very distant cousin to another courtesan: “The Prodigal Son’s” Siren. The part gives Maria Allash a chance to show off her huge jump and she sparkles with malevolence as she’s being wanton or betraying the rebels.

If your preference is for form, “Spartacus” can be rough going, but even if you prefer force the ballet can still go right over the top. The bacchanalia in Act III with courtesans shimmying and squadrons of leaping shepherds doing karate chops had me torn; I wasn’t sure whether to be awed or just to giggle. Also, the technique in the ballet feels almost quaint. Whether it’s a good development or not is a matter of debate, but a split leap looks primitive as a display of male virtuosity in our age of triple saut de basques.

Force may have the last laugh over Form. American audiences are showing a preference for the narrative ballet. We're not making new Petipa ballets either, where abstracted dance is a metaphor for the narrative. We're making "Dracula" and "Beauty and The Beast", the American analogue to this type of ballet—the Dansical. If that's the future of American ballet, we' re still waiting for the ballet that can tap into the American psyche with the same success as "Spartacus".

copyright ©2005 by Leigh Witchel
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Anna
Участник форума
Участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 06.05.2003
Сообщения: 243

СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 26, 2005 3:07 am    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

Пока гастроли проходят с грандиозным успехом. Зал распродан на все спектакли. “Светлый Ручей” составляет единственное исключение. Видимо, сказалось настороженное отношение к коллективному сельскому хозяйству и бессердечная ценовая политика. Зрители реагируют шумно, восторженно (на Машином «ДК» впервые, не без удивления, услышала в Мете вдохновенное улюлюканье). В зале царит ощутимое возбуждение, и публика пребывает в ожидании чего-то из ряда вон выходящего.

Дон Киxот
19 июля – Александрова, Клевцов
21 июля — Захарова, Уваров

По спектаклю столь перегруженному характерными танцами трудно судить о возможностях труппы в целом, для этого придется ждать непокорную дочь Фараона, а пока самое большое удовольствие доставили великолепные солисты— искрометные Ольга Стеблецова и Анна Ребецкая (подружки Китри), захватывающая и женственная Кристина Карасева в характерной вариации с кастаньетами (Таверна), трогательный и романтичный Дон-Лопаревич, нежная Нелли Кобахидзе в сцене Сна и в вальсовой вариации Гранд па (удивительное чувство формы) и, особенно, Наташа Осипова. После ее прыжковой вариации зал был ошеломлен. Но мне кажется, что эта чудо-девочка – больше, чем ее прыжок, из-за которого у зрителей отваливалась челюсть. Она вся светится.

Китри-Захарова была премилой кисочкой. Играла живо и непосредственно, чего за ней раньше не наблюдала, и самым удачным, на мой взгляд, неожиданно стал именно первый акт. В Сне и Гранд па она танцевала как чемпионка на Олимпийских играх. Зал был в восторге.

У Александровой, наоборот, лучше всего получился именно “Сон”. Она все сумела сделать очень “вкусно”, и, варьируя динамику, преподнесла свои вариации во всем их блеске и диапазоне. Конечно, у Маши шикарный прыжок, но и все мелкие па, пробежки на пальцах, например, были так неожиданно рельефны и ювелирно отделаны, что глаз не успевал вобрать все сокровища, которыми одаривал танец. С другой стороны, в игровых сценах первого акта ее Китри была резка, самовлюбленна, рисована. На Базиля реагировала надуманно. Александрова не субретка, но ведь и Китри - тоже. Есть над чем работать.

Клевцов танцевал хорошо, но он недостаточно высок для Маши, что было очень заметно в пируэтах. С другой стороны, Уваров - замечательный Базиль. Он очень смешно “умирал”, танцевал отменно, и был внимательным партнером.
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Ani
Участник форума
Участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 13.05.2003
Сообщения: 305

СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 26, 2005 9:36 am    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

После дебюта в «Светлом ручье» в Нью-Йорке Светлана Лунькина возведена в ранг прима-балерины.

Drb:
Цитата:
At the end of tonight's performance of his ballet, The Bright Stream, Artistic Director Alexei Ratmansky addressed the audience in English, then turned and addressed the Company in Russian. The collective's Morale Officer Svetlana Lunkina was promoted to the company's first rank, Principal.


От всей души поздравляю Светлану!


Последний раз редактировалось: Ani (Вт Июл 26, 2005 9:50 am), всего редактировалось 2 раз(а)
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
amber
Заслуженный участник форума
Заслуженный участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 30.08.2004
Сообщения: 1980

СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 26, 2005 9:45 am    Заголовок сообщения: Большой в США - 2005 Ответить с цитатой

Уважаемая Ani, вы меня немного опередели, но это ведь не важно? Smile
Важно, что Светлана Лунькина стала прима-балериной и я присоеднияюсь к Вашим поздравлениям Светлане. Последнее время она танцевала все лучше и лучше и , надеюсь та же тенденция сохранится впредь.
С уважением,amber
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Михаил Александрович
Модератор
Модератор


Зарегистрирован: 06.05.2003
Сообщения: 18627
Откуда: Москва

СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 26, 2005 11:34 am    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

Участник Ballet Alert Carbo сообщает дополнительные подробности. После того, как Ратманский повторил по-русски свое объявление о назначении Лунькиной примой Большого театра, труппа зааплодировала, а Маша Александрова преподнесла Светлане свой букет. Все это было очень эмоционально, а Светлана смотрелась как победительница конкурса Мисс Америка.

Уже цитировавшийся выше DRB пишет также, что Маша Александрова выглядела волшебно в роли Классической танцовщицы, принесшей ей Золотую Маску, и что Светлана Лунькина была очень похожа на Жизель в сцене на скамейке. Он же отмечает, что в труппе Большого полно танцовщиков, которые не только могут играть, но и проявляют в спектакле свою индивидуальность. И что это позволяет зрителям «Светлого ручья» легко следить за действием – увидев характеры персонажей, их уже не перепутаешь. По его мнению, «Светлый ручей» должен быть в списке спектаклей на следующих гастролях. Заключает восклицанием: «Брави, коллектив Большого!»

Присоединяюсь к поздравлениям в адрес Светланы Лунькиной. Ее возвращение после декретного отпуска в лучшем качестве стало одним из событий прошедшего сезона. И продвижение Светланы в примы вполне заслуженно. Ратманский нашел также подходящее время и место, чтобы объявить об этом. Очень хорошо, что поддержана традиция публичного объявления о назначении на высшую позицию.
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение Отправить e-mail
Inga
Активный участник форума
Активный участник форума


Зарегистрирован: 06.05.2003
Сообщения: 546
Откуда: Москва

СообщениеДобавлено: Вт Июл 26, 2005 12:10 pm    Заголовок сообщения: Ответить с цитатой

Присоединяюсь к поздравлениям в адрес Лунькиной! Со стороны Ратманского было разумно объявить о продвижении в Нью-Йорке - дополнительный пиар будет очень уместен. Балету нужны красивые сказки, и история эфемерного создания, которое в юности покорило этот город в "Жизели", а теперь там же официально объявлено примой, выглядит трогательно.
Вернуться к началу
Посмотреть профиль Отправить личное сообщение
Показать сообщения:   
Начать новую тему   Ответить на тему    Список форумов Балет и Опера -> Балетное фойе Часовой пояс: GMT + 4
На страницу Пред.  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  След.
Страница 3 из 7

 
Перейти:  
Вы не можете начинать темы
Вы не можете отвечать на сообщения
Вы не можете редактировать свои сообщения
Вы не можете удалять свои сообщения
Вы не можете голосовать в опросах